Is Cosmetic Surgery Safe?

Is cosmetic surgery safeIn Australia, cosmetic surgery is a billion dollar industry. Since there has been a significant drop in the cost of cosmetic procedures in the country, Aussies, who are mostly women, opt to go under the knife here in the Down Under instead of going overseas. Like any other surgical procedure, there are risks associated with cosmetic surgery. This begs us to the question, “Is cosmetic surgery safe?”

Is Cosmetic Surgery Safe?

Basically, cosmetic surgeries are safe. In fact, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons said that the mortality rate in cosmetic surgeries is 0.00001% or 1 in 57,000. You are most likely to get injured in a motor vehicle accident than die from cosmetic surgery. However, there are reported cases of complications after the procedure and/or injuries while at the cosmetic surgical clinic. When any of these happen, you should contact medical negligence lawyers who will guide you on your next step.

The Sydney Morning Herald reported that a woman was rushed to a hospital after suffering from cardiac arrest while in the middle of a breast augmentation procedure. In 2014, another woman sustained a punctured lung during a breast enlargement procedure. There were also patients who had life-threatening complications when a surgical clinic gave them unsafe doses of sedatives. Because of a long list of complaints from patients, the government instituted new guidelines regarding the safety standards of cosmetic surgeries. Existing laws that monitor the industry were also reinforced to provide better protection to patients.

According to ABC, patients are also at fault for the deaths and complications that may arise during or after the procedure. A British poll showed that there are patients who do not even check if the surgeon is qualified to perform the procedure. This led cosmetic surgeons in Australia to organise an awareness campaign known as “Think Over Before You Make Over.” As per Dr. Tony Kane, the president of the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons, people tend to base their decisions on the cost and accessibility of the clinic rather than the qualifications of the doctor. He is hoping that the campaign will allow the public to scrutinise their doctors before going under the knife.